Nuclear battery in the offing; no need to charge phone for 50 yrs!

The battery's design incorporates layers to ensure it is resistant to catching fire or exploding under sudden force. Betavolt asserts that the battery is capable of functioning within a broad temperature range

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Jasleen Kaur
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PTC Web Desk: A Chinese start-up, Betavolt, claimed to have created a groundbreaking battery capable of producing electricity for 50 years without requiring charging or maintenance. According to a report in The Independent, Betavolt, based in Beijing, has developed a nuclear battery that is remarkably compact, smaller than a coin, housing 63 isotopes. The company claims this achievement marks the world's first miniaturisation of atomic energy in a battery.

Currently, the upcoming nuclear battery technology is undergoing testing and is poised for large-scale production to cater to commercial applications, including smartphones and drones. Betavolt stated that its atomic energy batteries are versatile enough to fulfill the demand for enduring power supply across various sectors, such as aerospace, AI equipment, medical devices, microprocessors, advanced sensors, small drones, and micro-robots, as mentioned in the company's press release.

The statement further added that this innovative energy technology would play a pivotal role in positioning China at the forefront of the ongoing AI technological revolution.

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The Dimensions

The nuclear battery's dimensions are 15 x 15 x 5 millimeters, constructed from wafer-thin layers of nuclear isotopes and diamond semiconductors, according to information from Futurism. Currently, the nuclear battery produces 100 microwatts of power at 3 volts. However, Betavolt aims to achieve a 1-watt power output by the year 2025.

Importantly, Betavolt has assured that the radiation emitted by the battery poses no threat to the human body, rendering it safe for use in medical devices like pacemakers.

How does it work?

The battery operates by harnessing energy from decaying isotopes, a concept initially explored in the 20th century, and subsequently converts this energy into electricity. China, as part of its 14th Five-Year Plan from 2021-2025, has been actively engaged in the miniaturization of nuclear batteries, culminating in this innovative technology.

The battery's design incorporates layers to ensure it is resistant to catching fire or exploding under sudden force. Betavolt asserts that the battery is capable of functioning within a broad temperature range, spanning from -60 degrees Celsius to 120 degrees Celsius.

Furthermore, Betavolt claims that the atomic energy batteries are environmentally friendly. After the decay period, the 63 isotopes transition into a stable isotope of copper, which is non-radioactive and poses no threat or pollution to the environment.

The commencement of mass production is anticipated once the company completes testing and obtains all necessary clearances.

nuclear battery atomic energy batteries Betavolt
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